Applied Computer Science (Games Development Option), Bachelor of Science, Full-time (867ABSC) - BCIT (2023)

September 2023 Matrix

The below program matrix is effective for students entering the program in September 2023 and later.

Level 5 (15 weeks) Credits COMP 7035Operating Systems

​This course is focused on advanced concepts in operating systems: inter-process communication, inter-core synchronization, memory organization and management, virtual memory, uniprocessor and multiprocessor scheduling, input/output management, modern storage strategies, file management and security. Concepts of processes and threads, inter-process communication, concurrency and synchronization will be discussed. Students will learn about the design of operating system structures and related algorithms and policies with a focus on performance and optimization. For example: placement and replacement memory algorithms, scheduling algorithms, resident set management and load control theories. The course will include an introduction to virtualization. To illustrate the concepts, each topic will include examples of real life design choices used in modern operating systems (e.g., UNIX, Linux, Windows, and Android).​
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BscACS) program.

course outline

3.0COMP 7051Introduction to Computer Games Development

This course provides students with an introduction to games development. The focus in this course is to create a number of games using available industry tools such as Unity3D. Students will complete small game assignments as a well as a larger game as part of a team development environment. The course will cover topics including basic game design, 2D and 3D rendering and modelling, basic audio, input devices (Controllers, Keyboard, Mice), storage and networking. The emphasis will be on basic game design, simple game architectures and basic game project scoping and management.
Prerequisite(s):

  • COMP 7903 ( may be taken concurrently)
  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science program.

course outline

3.0COMP 7082Software Engineering

This course offers a comprehensive overview of software engineering issues: software development methodologies, software requirements analysis, functional and non-functional requirements, software architecture, design principles and paradigms, and quality assurance. Students will learn how to apply principles, use the most adequate strategies and tools, and assure quality during the entire software development cycle.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BScACS) program.

course outline

3.0COMP 7903Games Design Fundamentals

In this course students will learn concepts and processes of game design and will study human nature in order to create meaningful and engaging experiences. Students will study design from both a theoretical and an applied standpoint. Students will assess and quantify the validity of game design in existing games and use this knowledge to create an interactive experience using a team-oriented design methodology. In this course students will be unpacking game design principles that have made successful games such as chess, Tetris, cards, and other physical and digital games popular across centuries and cultures. Specific emphasis is placed on both the examination and deconstruction of historical successes and failures. Focus is also placed on the role of individuals in a team-oriented design methodology. The course will consist of interactive lectures and weekly activities where students are expected to actively participate and engage in the culture of design, classroom activities and critique games as it relates to the field. The result of this course is the development of individual game prototypes and team based digital game prototypes.
Prerequisite(s):

  • COMP 7051 ( may be taken concurrently)

course outline

3.0MATH 7808Calculus for Computing

​This course introduces the major concepts of calculus: differentiation, integration, and differential equations as applied to computing. The course covers both single and multivariable differentiation for basic functions and some basic single variable integration, both definite and indefinite. It will finish with a short introduction to differential equations applied to modeling physical phenomena.
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BscACS) program.
4.0 Level 6 (15 weeks) Credits COMP 7905Art in Game Development

​This course introduces learners to the art production and implementation pipeline in game development. Learners will encounter technical considerations and challenges surrounding the creation, implementation, and optimization of art assets in games and visual 3D interactive experiences. During this course, learners individually pitch and develop a short interactive visual experience in a game engine that matches an established aesthetic and art direction. Through this project and supporting weekly workshops, learners will experience the 3D asset creation pipeline (Modelling, Texturing, Rigging, and Animating), learn the fundamentals of visual design (composition, color theory, and lighting), create custom shaders and visual effects, and asset implementation/optimization techniques. Learners will also take a planned iterative approach to asset creation and level design.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in COMP 7051 and 60% in COMP 7903

course outline

3.0COMP 8042Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures Design and Analysis

The objective of this course is to apply concepts and problem-solving techniques that are used in the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. This course will provide students with exposure and practice to more advanced data structures and algorithmic strategies used in software development. Students will identify real world problems and apply a heuristic approach to solve them. After reviewing basic data structures and algorithms, students will apply advanced analysis techniques and algorithms. Particular emphasis will be placed on efficiency and optimization.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in MATH 7908 and 60% in MATH 7808 ( may be taken concurrently)

course outline

3.0COMP 8051Advanced Games Architecture

This course provides students with an introduction to the design of a game system using cross-platform tools and frameworks commonly used in the games industry. The focus in this course is to build a number of small mobile games as well as to design and build a basic engine and game for mobile platforms. To achieve the goals of realizing playable games in a short time frame, students will also be introduced to common tools and techniques used in the game industry. Students will complete smaller assignments on an individual basis as well as a larger game as part of a team development environment. The course will cover topics including game design and architectures, game physics, and 2D and 3D graphics.
Prerequisite(s):

  • COMP 7051

course outline

3.0COMP 8082Project Management

This course offers a comprehensive overview of project management techniques to effectively plan, manage, and control software development projects. Students will learn project management methodologies with an emphasis on software projects and agile methodology. Students will design a project for which they will create a project work breakdown structure; identify risks, inter-operability, and privacy and security issues; establish the necessary roles in the software development team; and apply strategies to control the project schedule and quality. Students will also discuss ethical and sustainability considerations from a project management perspective.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in COMP 7082

course outline

3.0MATH 7908Linear Algebra and Applications for Computing

This course covers the basics of linear algebra and related topics, including vector algebra with its application to 3D geometry, matrix algebra with application to solving systems of linear equations, complex numbers/ vectors and discrete Fourier Transforms. Matrix topics will include linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, similarity of matrices and applications of these. Concepts such as vector spaces, inner product spaces, and symmetric and orthogonal matrices are also introduced. Computer algorithms for performing various matrix operations and calculations and discrete Fourier Transforms will be explored.
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BScACS) program.

course outline

4.0 Level 7 (15 weeks) Credits COMP 7003Introduction to Information and Network Security

This course provides in-depth coverage of TCP/IP and "real-world" network traffic analysis using tools such as Wireshark and tcpdump. Students are introduced to securing servers and services as well as monitoring systems for performance and intrusion. Students will gain practical knowledge in the use of public-key encryption in securing information and implementing secure automatic logins and file transfers. This course provides coverage of perimeter protection and firewall designs, intrusion detection and IDS/IPS design and their implementation.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BscACS) program.

course outline

3.0COMP 8085Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the intelligence expected to be demonstrated by machines and computer programs. This course is designed to provide students with expertise in creating and modifying required AI algorithms and techniques. The first part of the course will focus on classic AI solutions (especially decision making) while the second part will cover some of machine learning (ML) related applications of AI (with an emphasis on learning from examples). The course will consider real world problems that need to be solved with applications of AI and the techniques used to build such applications (e.g. using the techniques to create challenging non player characters (NPC) in games development or password strength classification and intrusion detection in network security). More specifically, students will learn about the searching paradigm in designing intelligent agents and will practice implementing search algorithms. Probabilistic reasoning will also be explored to help students learn how to deal with incomplete information and uncertainty. The course will also examine different learning techniques to guide students in creating self-learning models that can improve performance in decision-making over time through practical examples.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in COMP 8042

course outline

3.0COMP 8552Advanced Games Programming Techniques

​This course will provide the student with an introduction to more advanced computing methods related to building a simple game engine. The course will focus on materials not covered in other programming courses and will include topics on advanced programming, optimization, multi-threading, real-time programming considerations and hardware interfaces. Students will be exposed to different technologies and programming environments. Students will also learn basic physics concepts and how to apply them when building a game engine. These concepts include basic physics and mathematics governing natural phenomena such as force, kinematics, inertia, and momentum.​ Students are recommended to have C++ knowledge.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in COMP 8051 and 60% in COMP 7035

course outline

3.0COMP 8800Major Project 1

The objectives of this course are to give students the opportunity to explore in-depth a selected area of computer technology and identify complex real-world problems. Students will select a problem to solve in their Major Project. They will critically analyze the problem, existing challenges and issues, and related products and literature. Students will prepare a project proposal that includes the project’s objectives, specifications, review of similar systems and related products and literature, feasibility analysis, and a design of a solution that should be inventive, experimental or exploratory in nature. Students will also complete the first 2 of 5 milestones of the project during the course. This course is directed study under the guidance of a supervisor. Students will follow a software engineering methodology. Please refer to the Major Projects Guidelines as described on the BScACS Commons webpage.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in COMP 8082 and 50% in LIBS 7001
  • At least one 8000 level specialty course.

course outline

3.0LIBS 7001Critical Reading and Writing

This is a course in advanced composition and rhetoric, in which students will develop skills in complex critical analysis and interpretation by analyzing and evaluating materials from a variety of discourses or genres, including visual, online, and print; developing and writing essays, including critiques and research papers; applying and discussing principles of rhetoric and critical theory; examining and using methods of interpretation and analysis from the humanities and social sciences; evaluating the credibility of primary and secondary sources, including as it applies to media literacy, and for the purposes of academic research; situating discourses within their historical context and relevant to rhetorical theories of different periods (for example, Aristotle in the ancient world and Bakhtin in the twentieth century). The course format will include lecture, discussion, and both individual and group activities.
Prerequisite(s):

  • BCIT ENGL 1177 or equivalent, or 6 credits BCIT Communication at 1100-level or above, or 3 credits of a university/college first-year social science or humanities course.

course outline

3.0LIBS 7002Applied Ethics*

Fosters abilities and values required for ethical decision making at work. Develops skills in logical analysis, a working knowledge of moral principles and theories, and the ability to diagnose and resolve moral disagreements commonly found at work. Examines and applies moral principles to historically famous cases in manufacturing, human resources, management, engineering, health care, and computing.
Prerequisite(s):

  • BCIT ENGL 1177, or 6 credits BCIT Communication at 1100-level or above, or 3 credits of a university/college first-year social science or humanities course.

course outline

3.0 *Students who have completed the Computer Systems Technology (CST) Diploma are exempt from taking LIBS 7002 Applied Ethics since they have already taken the equivalent course, LIBS 7102 Ethics for Computing Professionals. Level 8 (15 weeks) Credits COMP 7012Interaction Design

As computers and digital devices are ubiquitous and embedded in everyday objects, it is very important to focus on designing intuitive, effective and simple interactions. This course will present an introduction to principles of human-computer interaction and will explore the concepts and practices used for interaction design: information architecture, immersion techniques, prototyping, user-centered design, usability design and testing and user research. Principles of designing for accessibility and ethical considerations will be discussed and applied. Students will evaluate and design several interfaces for software applications (e.g., desktop, mobile and web) and pervasive computing devices (e.g., wearable, AR/AM/VR, and voice interaction devices), and will design a low-fidelity prototype.
Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science (BscACS) program.

course outline

3.0COMP 8900Major Project 2

​Based on their approved proposal and initial stages of the project developed in Comp 8800 Major Project 1, students will continue to implement, test and deliver their major project. This course is directed study under the guidance of a supervisor. Students will follow a software engineering methodology. The outcome of this course is a working project and a final report. Please refer to the Major Projects Guidelines as described on the BScACS Commons webpage.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • COMP 8800

course outline

3.0 General Education Electives (9.0 credits):
Will be offered in Level 8.
Specific course offerings will be determined by the department. Co-op work term courses (competitive entry)
Credits Complete between Levels 6 and 7. COMP 7990Cooperative Education Workterm 1*

​Cooperative Education (Co-op) involves enhancing the educational experience by integrating traditional academic studies with relevant work experience. The student is employed for the duration of the Co-op Work Term placement period. The Co-op Work Term is a paid position where the student completes productive tasks that relate directly to the core competencies of the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science Program. The Co-op position is approved by the Co-op Coordinator. Students in the program attend mandatory pre-employment workshops to enhance their employability prior to their Co-op placement and compete for job postings during the second academic term. During the work term, students are monitored by the Co-op Coordinator.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful application and admission to the Co-op Program, 75% GPA in term 5 with no failures or withdrawals and no pending grade appeals.

course outline

16.0COMP 8990Cooperative Education Workterm 2**

​Cooperative Education (Co-op) involves enhancing the educational experience by integrating traditional academic studies with relevant work experience. The student is employed for the duration of the Co-op Work Term placement period. The Co-op Work Term is a paid position where the student completes productive tasks that relate directly to the core competencies of the Bachelor of Science in Applied Computer Science Program. The Co-op position is approved by the Co-op Coordinator. Students in the program attend mandatory pre-employment workshops to enhance their employability prior to their Co-op placement and compete for job postings during the second academic term. During the work term, students are monitored by the Co-op Coordinator.​
Prerequisite(s):

  • COMP 7990

course outline

16.0 *Fall intake: September through December
**Winter intake: January through April Total Credits: 65.0
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